Category Archives: certified scope manager (CSM)

CSM - The Real Estate Agents of Software Development

CSM stands for Certified Scope Manager.

I just returned from Japan where I attended ISO software and systems engineering meetings in Niigata, guest-lectured at the University of Niigata, and spoke at a special event convened by the Japan Function Point Users Group (JFPUG) to discuss northernSCOPE and scope management.  Present were over 50 software professionals representing some of the most prominent and influential Japanese companies including Hitashi, Mitsubishi, IBM, and others.

Carol with executive board members of JFPUG

Carol with executive board members of JFPUG

It continues to become more and more clear how scope management and the new job role recognized by the European Certificates Association called “Certified Scope Manager” fills in the missing links in today’s software development. As I’ve stated before, I believe that the supplier side of the customer/supplier relationship does a fine job in developing software when the customer is engaged and there are good requirements.

Software developers and project managers do excellent work – and I stand by my assertion that the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) and the Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) approaches have done much to advance us to a better, more professional state.

BUT, the fact remains that there is a gap between the customers (who often abdicate requirements and planning to suppliers) and the software development team! And the gap hasn’t gone away despite advancements in business analysis (BABOK) and other professional endeavors.  We need what the home building and buying industry has had for years – Real Estate Agents! (Note that real estate agents represent a buyer in terms of knowing the best neighborhoods, cost per square foot competitive values, are aware of building codes and zoning, know how to navigate the mortgage and title industries, and can also represent a seller.)

This is where the Certified Scope Manager (CSM) fits in:  s/he is the Real Estate Agent of software development. Certainly there are bits and pieces of this work that are picked up by project managers, business analysts, metrics specialists, cost estimators, etc. but to-date there has been no solid single job role that works as the Customer Advocate AND performs all the tasks of a Scope Manager.

Here’s a short list of functions a Certified Scope Manager performs on a typical software intensive systems project:

Works with the customer or business unit upfront to articulate and document high level functional and non-functional (quality and product performance) requirements;

Works with the customer to subdivide the work into manageable projects (Note: often what the business considers to be a project is actually a program of projects that are managed separately. This is similar to doing site selection, building, and landscaping in a home construction project. Each piece is a separate project.);

Works with the customer to create RFPs (Requests for Proposal) for each sub-project as defined above, and solicits bids to come in with unit pricing (e.g., $ per Function Point for new development, $ per hour for data migration, etc) for each;

Works with the customer to evaluate the bids and select the best value suppliers;

– After the requirements phase is completed between the customer and supplier, baselines each project size using Function Points or other sizing measure (as applicable to the type of project);

Works with the supplier to report progress and completion (percentages) by delivered feature/function as the projects progress, and produces progress reports for the customer;

Works with both supplier and customer to analyze proposed changes and assesses the cost impact based on unit pricing (same as for the awarded contracts);

Updates project delivery (and baseline) based on approved changes;

Identifies issues (earned value) during the project and works with the customer to discuss such issues with the supplier;

Figures out the final bills for work delivered based on unit pricing and product delivery;

Captures lessons learned (and too often forgotten) on each project into an experience database for use on later projects.

The Scope Manager is an octopus of sorts; a swiss army knife; a jack-of-all trades in the areas often neglected in customer advocacy on software intensive systems projects.  And he/she accomplishes all of this in a matter of 2-3 days per project.

Let me know if you’d like articles with more details on the subject, and if you’d like me to talk to your management about how scope management can improve your software intensive systems projects.

The Japanese attendees were fervent in their support and now will discuss how to make northernSCOPE and the Certified Scope Manager job role a reality in Japan.  The first hurdle (and the biggest) is translation – after that, it’s working to change the flawed firm-fixed-pricing mentality that prevails throughout the world to one of unit pricing – especially when requirements are not well-known.

To your successful projects!

Carol

Carol Dekkers
email: dekkers@qualityplustech.com
http://www.qualityplustech.com/stage/

For more information on northernSCOPE(TM) visit www.fisma.fi (in English pages) and for upcoming training in Tampa, Copenhagen, Dusseldorf, Helsinki and other locations in 2010, visit www.qualityplustech.com.
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=======Copyright 2010, Carol Dekkers ALL RIGHTS RESERVED =======

Rework, bloody rework

Did you know that published studies cite rework as being over 40% of software development effort? It’s incredible when we put this into realistic terms – it means that every Monday and Tuesday and Wednesday we make bona fide progress in software development, and then every Thursday and Friday – we get to redo that work!

Naturally there are the unpredictable legislative or business changes that happen after the requirements have been set (in waterfall development) or after the sprint was released (in agile), but often the rework concerns changes or clarifications to existing specifications.  In other words, there is substantial rework even when there are no unanticipated changes such as when:

– Requirements are incomplete;
– Requirements are inaccurate;
– Requirements didn’t include enough stakeholders;
– Scope didn’t include quality requirements;
– Requirements were excluded (because they may have been system requirements that were not going to be solved with software);
– User sponsor changed and new stakeholders changed the direction;
– Communications went astray;
– There was no communication (i.e., lack of understanding).

When any non-value added task on a project consumes so much effort (and cost) it makes sense to take steps to remedy it.  While there are opportunities to streamline the processes involved in developing software — much has already been done in this area through the Capability Maturity Model (CMM) and other initiatives.  More gains can be made by working closely with customers as a customer advocate – such as the new set of tasks proposed for the Certified Scope Manager – a new job role ideal for QA specialists, Project Managers, developers, program experts, metrics specialists and others.  Scope management has already proven itself to provide outstanding communication and project governance in Australia and Finland, isn’t it about time that you took a serious look at this new approach?

To your successful projects!

Carol

Carol Dekkers
email: dekkers@qualityplustech.com
http://www.qualityplustech.com/stage/

For more information on northernSCOPE(TM) visit www.fisma.fi (in English pages) and for upcoming training in Tampa, Copenhagen, Dusseldorf, Helsinki and other locations in 2010, visit www.qualityplustech.com.
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=======Copyright 2010, Carol Dekkers ALL RIGHTS RESERVED =======

Technophobia is more real than global warming

Have you read the hype lately about global warming – it seems to go in spurts and depending on how slow a news day it happens to be, it can be world news one day and relegated to the back of the classifieds the next.  While I don’t want to make a mockery of the effects of climate change on our planet (I haven’t done the full research to know whether to believe the Republicans or Democrats or the farmers on this one!) – I do think that global warming is the news du jour and the topic becomes a soapbox whenever a politician wants their 15 minutes of fame.

One thing that I know is an issue in software development and is seldom discussed is Technophobia or the irrational fear of technology.  One might be convinced that there is no such thing as technophobia when we read how the latest Apple iPad supplies swarmed off the shelves into the eager arms of technology savvy consumers, but I have to wonder what’s the true story. Every day, in every city, in almost every country I speak in, I meet professionals (and some are gen X’ers!) who are literally in the dark when it comes to technology. And, here’s the scary part, they might even be on your project teams!  (No, not on the software development side, of course, the customer/business/shareholder side) And furthermore, you might not even know it.

Our obsession with agile development, faster/better/cheaper, acronyms, connectivity, networking (hardware not people), configuration management systems, and all the other productivity tools we embrace to speed up our software development processes miss the boat when it comes to truly discovering what our customers (especially those with technophobia) really need.

So, what can a project manager or business analyst or programmer do when we meet a stakeholder who we fear (hmmm is there a fear of someone with technophobia?) might have technophobia?  It might seem all a bit trite to say the least that someone would actually fear technology, but I can assure you that it exists and it is not a fear that goes away when talking to those who live, eat, and breathe technology!

This is where a scope manager or customer advocate can make inroads with stakeholders. Often pride prevents professionals from confessing to their technophobia – and it can be debilitating to admit that one doesn’t understand members of the project team at all. Scope management is customer advocacy as I’ve stated earlier posts – and the scope manager as an independent consultant has the luxury of spending time with the customer to truly discover the scope of the business problem before any systems or software engineers get involved.  That means that the customer invests time and energy in initial discovery and doesn’t waste it trying to talk about what they really meant – as often would happen if a Request for Proposal (RFP) goes out with mistaken or incomplete requirements scope.

Technophobia is real and all around us, and if we want to firmly gain control of the typical 40% rework that consumes our software development projects, we ought to take a solid look at what a scope manager can truly bring to our projects and programs.

To your successful projects!

Carol

Carol Dekkers
email: dekkers@qualityplustech.com
http://www.qualityplustech.com/stage/

For more information on northernSCOPE(TM) visit www.fisma.fi (in English pages) and for upcoming training in Tampa, Dusseldorf, Copenhagen, and other venues in 2010 visit www.qualityplustech.com.
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=======Copyright 2010, Carol Dekkers ALL RIGHTS RESERVED =======

Project Management versus Leadership - is there a difference?

What do you think?

Project Management is a well used phrase institutionalized by the Project Management Institute (PMI) through their Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) and the American Society for the Advancement of Project Management (an IPMA association). In years gone by, the term Project Leadership was popular to denote the practices of delivering value on projects aligned to the business needs.  Today there is Project Management, Project Governance, Program Management, Portfolio Management, System Management, and a raft of other management topics, but somehow the notion of Leadership has been forgotten in the quest to manage. Or perhaps it is a matter of leadership being taken for granted.

navigationI’ve posted often about the fact that given a set of solid requirements, software engineers can and will deliver great software solutions and I stand by that.  What is missing, however, is solid leadership or steersmanship to lead customers to the right business solutions and guide software and systems engineers to deliver to those needs.

This is the very area where Scope Management (using northernSCOPE) is different from Project Management and can deliver a huge ROI (return on investment) by leveraging and tying together the gaps in the problem-design-solution-delivery life cycle.

Last week in Tampa FL, two forward-thinking Peruvian IT engineers joined several early adopter American software professionals and attended Certified Scope Manager (CSM) training in Tampa.  What they took home from the four days of intensive scope manager training and a day of certification exam/consulting was a toolkit of new ideas and a solid methodology that’s working in Finland. These newly certified Scope Managers are customer advocates akin to professional real-estate-agents and architects long the mainstays in home building.

Watch this column for more upcoming workshops in the US and throughout Europe.  As the successes of unit pricing coupled with tangible high quality results become more prevalent with the newly certified Scope Managers, you’ll be seeing more about northernSCOPE(TM) and scope management. It’s project leadership in a new, evolutionary way.

To your successful projects!

Carol

Carol Dekkers
email: dekkers@qualityplustech.com
http://www.qualityplustech.com/stage/

For more information on northernSCOPE(TM) visit www.fisma.fi (in English pages) and for upcoming training in Tampa, Florida and in Europe, visit www.qualityplustech.com.
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=======Copyright 2010, Carol Dekkers ALL RIGHTS RESERVED =======

Forget NLP, customers need TLC

Years ago, neuro-linguistic programming (NLP) emerged as revolutionary approach to customer/sales psychology.  All one needed to do was to mirror customer behavior and customers would buy, buy, buy.  Some people might call the technique psychological manipulation and they might be right.  One thing is certain – IT customers just don’t engage and don’t commit as often or as readily as the general population.  Our techno-think approach to getting customers to buy into our solutions with NLP and related ideas is ill-conceived. What customers need is TLC (Tender Loving Communication).

Considering the short history of information technology (IT) you’ll notice a relatively young, immature industry with an intangible product (software).  When you couple the complexities of technology with high IQ of programmers (watch CBS’s Big Bang Theory comedy show for personality clues) it’s no wonder that IT customers feel intimidated on IT projects.

In the words of Clint Eastwood “What we have here is a failure to communicate.”

The IT world has progressed remarkably in terms of technical solutions and usability in the past few years, yet the (dis)connection  with customers has never been greater.  The infamous CHAOS reports (by the Standish Group) aside from the nuances of measurement in their studies concurs with other major studies showing that a mere 1/3 of IT projects succeed in meeting customer requirements and are delivered on schedule and on budget.

Customers don’t need more models, more approaches or more intimidation. What they need is tender loving communication (TLC) – in their own language.  How to gain this perspective as a software developer?  Here’s a few easy ways:

  • Read what your customers and stakeholders read (magazines, articles, websites). If you don’t know what these are, visit them and see what magazines are on their desks and ask them what journals are important to their business.
  • Find out the emerging trends facing your customers. Ask them what challenges keep them up at night. Start a dialogue about their daily challenges (aside from technology!)
  • Job shadow. Along the lines of the new television show Undercover Boss – ask to spend a day just observing what your customers do during a regular day.  (Maybe this could become a new “Take your IT person to Work day”?)
  • Take a walk around your customer’s site. In person visits to your customer’s place of work can be eye-opening and refreshing. Always ask your customer first though before simply showing up.
  • Ask, ask, ask – show an interest in the people. Somethimes there’s so much technology (e-mail, voicemail, teleconferencing, etc.) standing between true communication in the same office space that the human nature of communication becomes secondary to iPhones, blackberry’s and pc’s.  Take a few minutes at the beginning of a telephone call with your customers to find out how their day is really going instead of the “fine, fine how are you” rhetoric.
  • Read and research. I’ve been on many IT projects where the development team has been frustrated by a lack of response and participation by the customer group.  “It’s not our job to specify their requirements, that’s their job” is a familiar lament.  Take the time to do some research and brush up in your customer’s terminology and watch how much more open and receptive your customers may become.

By walking a mile in your customer’s moccasins so to speak, you’ll discover that customers are humans too – and with a bit of TLC (tender loving communication), client engagement will increase – and your rework will decrease.  A few simple ideas, no new models – just common sense.

To your successful projects!

Carol

Carol Dekkers
email: dekkers@qualityplustech.com
http://www.qualityplustech.com/stage/

For more information on northernSCOPE(TM) visit www.fisma.fi (in English pages) and for soon to be announced training dates in Copenhagen, Denmark and Amsterdam, Holland, visit www.qualityplustech.com.
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=======Copyright 2010, Carol Dekkers ALL RIGHTS RESERVED =======

Certified Scope Manager Training in Tampa in 2 weeks

We’ve got a few more seats in our upcoming Certified Scope Manager (CSM) training workshops in Tampa Apr 26-30, 2010 and in respect for the financial situation of many CSM candidates, we’re excited to announce a 20% discount on any of our single day workshops and a whopping 30% off of our weeklong suite of workshops culminating in the CSM exam. (Use discount code 20OFF and 30OFF in the comments section of our registration form at www.qualityplustech.com/CSM_training.html)

Here’s the lineup of workshops:

  • Day 1:  Scope manager engagement and software program scoping
  • Day 2:   Project scope management and early estimation techniques
  • Day 3:   Effective project execution and collaboration
  • Day 4:  CSM tools: Experience®Pro
  • Day 5:   Scope Manager exam, summary and extended topics

Here’s a link to our downloadable workshop brochure: CSM workshops.

I hope you’ll join us in Tampa in 2 weeks!

To your successful projects!

Carol

Carol Dekkers
email: dekkers@qualityplustech.com
http://www.qualityplustech.com/stage/

For more information on northernSCOPE(TM) visit www.fisma.fi (in English pages) and for upcoming training in Tampa, Florida  — April 26-30, 2010, visit www.qualityplustech.com.
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=======Copyright 2010, Carol Dekkers ALL RIGHTS RESERVED =======

No more Software Development Blame Game...

I remember in the 1990’s when the crevasse between software developers and customers supposedly was solved by adding business analysts to project teams. No longer was there an ‘us’ and ‘them’ mentality (if you believed the promoters) but rather a cohesive partnership with both sides singing “Kum ba yah” and working as a team in harmony.  The 1996 CHAOS report (not-withstanding the issues with the exact percentages which was the subject of my recent post) announced that software projects were successful only 1/6 of the time (16%). A decade later, the numbers have doubled to so that today, about 1/3 of software projects being proclaimed as successful. Much of the increase can be attributed to advancements made by the software development community in terms of technology and process improvements.

Yet, we’ve still got failures and rework (rework accounts for between 40% and 45% of software development effort depending on the source) and dissatisfied customers.  And we’ve got dysfunction in project initiation fueled by the apathy (and technology ignorance) by acquirers and customers, and the burden of fixed price contracts (allowing for limited flexibility) on the part of suppliers.  So we begin project at a deficit point (lack of customer engagement and inflexibility of fixed price contracts for poorly scoped work), and when changes happen – it compounds the situation.  While the customer argues that new requests for functionality are actually clarifications to the original scope of work, the supplier argues that such requests are changes to the scope and should be paid for as change orders.

Blame GameThe resultant blame game (whose fault was it that there is a change or clarification or modification) is unproductive for the partnership or teams or whatever you want to call the customer / supplier relationship.  It’s not a problem of the software development or construction processes, it’s a more insidious problem of lack of scope management.

Sometimes it helps to use an analogy to clarify the situation for non-technical customers:  Say I need a restaurant or  maybe a b&b (bed and breakfast) built, the site landscaped, and a parking lot for cars (and maybe even a boat dock for patrons).  If  I ask a builder to give me a firm fixed price (based on their past experience with similar work) – it is easy to see the intrinsic risks of fixed pricing:  what if the site is in Alaska versus Miami, what if I choose a mountainous area versus the plains?  What if I decide I want more seating than originally thought?  What if the bed and breakfast becomes a spa, bed and breakfast?  What if I need to dig a channel to connect the main waterways with the restaurant for boats? The “project” is in fact a combination of many potential projects (each will need a separate estimating equation) and the lack of solid requirements and choice of site (with its building code) impedes exact pricing.  If I do engage a builder to do such work – there are so many assumptions built into the price that the flexibility to make changes throughout the project will be minimal.  On the other hand if we were given solid requirements, customer engagement and approval, and a specific site, the work would progress through the construction project with far less issue.

So, too with software development.  Premature fixed price contracts where multiple projects are involved (within the context of a single ‘business  project’) are destined to fail.  There isn’t an oracle on earth who can accurately predict the cost of a software development program prior to requirements – and yet customer management routinely insists that it can be done.

Here’s where the dysfunction  lies – it’s not up to a business analyst to scope out, size, explain the importance of involvement and engagement to the customer, subdivide the “project” into component sub-projects (e.g., migration, enhancement, new development, and conversion projects are all typically lumped into a single scope of work by the well-intentioned but ill-advised customer), chart the progress against the baseline, manage and assess the impact of change on the suite of projects, etc.  The customer is often left to their own (technology ignorant) devices to know what, where and how they need to be involved as the construction begins and progresses.

In building construction, there is a general contractor or architect over the entire job – in software development, we have a myriad of people who profess to do so – but given the industry success rates, we’re not succeeding with the traditional approach.  And blaming each other when things don’t go right is downright unproductive and a drain on morale.

This is where a Certified Scope Manager (CSM) can make a big impact on software development.  The building/construction processes in software development are not broken – they work fine as long as there are good requirements (even good user stories!), it is the customer interface and flawed fixed pricing that is the problem.  A certified scope manager works on behalf of the customer/ acquirer and subdivides the scope of work into independently managed sub-projects.  Then the scope manager works together with the customer to document high level requirements (both functional and quality requirements) for each sub-project – and creates one or more RFP’s (requests for proposal) from suppliers.

The suppliers do not bid based on fixed price but rather on unit pricing ($ per Function Point or $ per hour as applicable) for each piece. At this point, the scope manager works with the customer to assess the bids (and compares them to benchmark unit prices for similar completed work) and award the contract(s) to suppliers.

At this point, the customer and supplier work together through requirements/ use cases/ user stories to determine the work to be done. The scope manager does not take part in the requirements or development, but simply creates a baseline of the functional size as the requirements roll-out and move into the construction phases.  With a baseline size, the customer can figure out the overall anticipated cost of each sub-project based on unit pricing.  The scope manager obtains progress reporting from the supplier as development progresses and reports such (in terms of functionality delivered or progress made) back to the customer.

Whenever changes occur, the scope manager (still acting objectively and on behalf of the customer) assesses the impact of including the change in the project and allocates payment for work done to date prior to the change. Throughout the project, the scope manager keeps track of all the work (prior to and after changes are made) that the supplier does to deliver the functionality requested by the customer. The Blame Game stops here!  Changes or clarifications or modifications to specs or whatever you want to call them are analyzed, assessed and the impact of incorporating them into the project is done objectively and the supplier will be paid for work done up to the point of change, and for customer directed changes. It no longer matters why there is deviation from the plan – it is simply a matter of include / exclude and the supplier no longer runs the risk of doing customer directed work for which they won’t be paid. (This is a major difference with unit pricing versus fixed pricing. Flexibility and change are easy with unit pricing!)

Ultimately the software solution(s) are completed and the scope manager assesses the overall delivery and tells the customer what amounts are owed the supplier based on work done and the unit pricing they agreed to during the contract awarding phase.

The last step (which unfortunately is another area often forgotten once the project is done) is to capture all the project data (actual hours expended, functionality actually delivered, lessons learned, etc) and record it in a knowledge database so that the next project can gain from this project.

It’s all common sense and contained in the northernSCOPE(TM) approach developed by the Finnish Software Measurement Association (FiSMA).  And, Certified Scope Manager training is now available in the United States.

Here’s a couple of articles I’ve written if you are interested in more information:

Achieving Olympic Success… with Scope Management

Scope management – 12 steps to ICT project recovery

Agile has made great strides in software development- but doesn’t cover the same focus with customers as scope management does. A scope manager works effectively with the customer and project teams on agile projects – but is not part of the project team.

Why not attend the upcoming Certified Scope Manager (CSM) training coming up in Tampa, FL April 26-30, 2010? Get out of the Blame Game and into productive software development – with scope management!

To your successful projects!

Carol

Carol Dekkers
email: dekkers@qualityplustech.com
http://www.qualityplustech.com/stage/

For more information on northernSCOPE(TM) visit www.fisma.fi (in English pages) and for upcoming training in Tampa, Florida  — April 26-30, 2010, visit www.qualityplustech.com.

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=======Copyright 2010, Carol Dekkers ALL RIGHTS RESERVED =======

Software Development needs a Customer Advocate

I am often asked (what is) the difference between a Certified Scope Manager (CSM) and a  ___ (fill in the blank: business analyst;  project manager; quality assurance specialist; project analyst, etc) – and the answer is threefold.

A scope manager is different from all the other traditional software development project team members in the following ways:

1. The scope manager is usually hired by the Customer or Acquisition side of software development, and is a customer advocate. As such, the scope manager is independent of the project team.

2. The scope manager does not take part in the software development except to report back to the customer on project progress and evaluate the impact of scope changes on the project.

3. The scope manager is an octupus in terms of knowledge because their expertise spans multiple disciplines:  facilitation and negotiation; ICT program management;  software metrics & estimation; business analysis; project management; northernSCOPE(TM); benchmarking (knowledge databases); change management.

A project scope manager works part-time on a project and bridges the gap between the customer and the software development team – and often is involved in multiple projects at one time.  While s/he is a customer advocate who ensures that the client requirements are defined before the development RFPs (requests for proposal) are issued, the involvement of the customer is tantamount in the entire process of scope management.  One of the biggest gains from concrete scope management is that software development is contracted for on a cost per function point basis and therefore both parties to the work benefit:

  • The customer pays for all software development that they request and receive; and
  • The supplier is paid for all the work that they perform at the customer’s direction.

This means that the customer always has the flexibility to make changes during the software development life cycle (SDLC) and pays for such change at the negotiated unit price.  The supplier gets paid for the work they do (and partial work done prior to changes being made) at the negotiated unit price.

One of the biggest advantages in the scope management approach is that a “project” is subdivided into sub-projects (each separately managed work product is a separate sub-project according to specified northernSCOPE(TM) rules) and priced according to competitive and historical rates of delivery. This means that web platform development is priced at a different price than mainframe development – akin to building construction being priced differently depending on the type of construction.

All in all, scope management is a straightforward means to solve customer abdication on software development projects and rewards the software supplier with payment for the work they do at the customer’s request.  Both sides win, the supplier works on the requirements that the customer needs for their business, and flexibility for ongoing change is built into the process.  Finally software development has the customer advocate they need – and both sides win!

Why not attend Certified Scope Manager (CSM) training in Tampa April 26-30, 2010?  Join us and register at www.qualityplustech.com/CSM_training.html.

To your successful projects!

Carol

Carol Dekkers
email: dekkers@qualityplustech.com
http://www.qualityplustech.com/stage/

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Scope Management - additional reading...

I found a few interesting blog postings related to IT scope management when I was perusing the web today:

1.  The Guerilla Project Manager post on “Scope Seep” – which offers a different perspective on the traditional idea of scope creep;

2.  A webinar on – Project Scope Management (PMP tutorial) – which offers a Project Management Institute viewpoint on scope management;

3. Links to two of my own recent articles:

Increase ICT success with Concrete Scope Management” article republished on the Compaid website; and

STSC’s CrossTalk publication of “Scope Management: 12 Steps to ICT project recovery

To your successful projects!

Carol

Carol Dekkers
email: dekkers@qualityplustech.com
http://www.qualityplustech.com/stage/

For more information on northernSCOPE(TM) visit www.fisma.fi (in English pages) and for upcoming training in Tampa, Florida  — April 26-30, 2010, visit www.qualityplustech.com.
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Certified Scope Management (CSM) training in Tampa -- April 26-30, 2010

I’ve spent a fair amount of time alluding to the benefits of scope management in the “practice” of software development. In addition, you may have been part of one of my webinars on Scope Management held over the past year.  (To listen to the Data and Analysis Center for Software (DACS) webinar on scope management (72 minutes) access it here).

Now finally, Certified Scope Management (CSM) training is coming to Tampa! (April 26-30, 2010).  Registration details can be found at www.qualityplustech.com.

Scope management consists of key concepts that directly address six of the top ten most prevalent reasons for software development project failure as cited by the Standish Group (www.standishgroup.com) in their annual CHAOS reports:

  1. Misunderstanding requirements
  2. Not managing change properly
  3. Failure to gain user commitment
  4. Failure to manage end user expectations
  5. Unclear/misunderstood scope/objectives
  6. Changing scope/objectives

Certified Scope Management (CSM) training is based on the concepts of northernSCOPE(TM) from the Finnish Software Measurement Association.  The northernSCOPE brochure can be downloaded here.

There are twelve steps involved in formal scope management and I’ve written a number of recent articles on the subject.   Quality Plus Technologies, Inc. scope management workshops are based on northernSCOPE(TM) concepts trademarked by the Finnish Software Measurement Association (www.fisma.fi) and formulated by the European Certificates Association in their Certified Scope Manager (CSM) designation.  If you are looking to improve your own effectiveness in software development, consider attending.  Click on this link to access the CSM_training_brochure.

To your successful projects!

Carol

Carol Dekkers
email: dekkers@qualityplustech.com
http://www.qualityplustech.com/stage/

Carol Dekkers provides realistic, honest, and transparent approaches to software measurement, software estimating, process improvement and scope management.  Call her office (727 393 6048) or email her (dekkers@qualityplustech.com) for a free initial consultation on how to get started to solve your IT project management and development issues.

For more information on northernSCOPE(TM) visit www.fisma.fi (in English pages) and for upcoming training in Tampa, Florida  — April 26-30, 2010, visit www.qualityplustech.com.

=======Copyright 2010, Carol Dekkers ALL RIGHTS RESERVED =======